CPS Announces Uniform Application Process for Selective Enrollment Seats

April 8, 2014 at 1:49 pm 123 comments

Chicago Public Schools said today that the standardized test being used for the first time in applications to the city’s top selective enrollment schools will also be required for private school students, but that those children won’t have to take the test until next fall.

Leaders of the city’s Catholic Schools last month had complained that the district’s switch to the Northwest Evaluation Association-Measures of Academic Progress (NWEA-MAP) test would put their students at a disadvantage.

In a letter to CPS and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Sister Mary Paul McCaughey, superintendent of Chicago’s Catholic Schools, said private school students would have just two months to prepare for the test, and that they would have to take it at a CPS site over the course of two Saturdays.

CPS students, she pointed out, would be able take the test in the classroom during normal school hours, and had at least an extra month to prepare because the district notified them of the switch earlier.

Following the district’s announcement today, McCaughey issued a statement saying while the archdiocese is satisfied that parents and students now will have time to prepare, the “site and manner of testing remain problematic.”

In her earlier letter, McCaughey had complained that test would be online in a computerized format unfamiliar to non-public school students, and had requested that CPS pay for the test to be administered at private schools so students could take the test in their own classroom.

CPS officials today  said private school students will be taking the NWEA-MAP test between Sept. 6, 2014, and Oct. 11, 2014.

CPS students will take the NWEA-MAP test at their schools later this spring.

When CPS first announced the new test for public school students, district parents were furious at the switch, complaining that their kids would be at a disadvantage because private schools students would be allowed to take the same standardized test they’ve always taken. CPS kids took the NWEA-MAP test last year, but the scores were not used for the selective enrollment process.

The need for a new test arose because the state changed a portion of the Illinois Standards Achievement Test—the standardized test used for public school students in previous decisions for selective enrollment schools. The ISAT this year is aligned with the new Common Core curriculum but is no longer providing the district with a percentile score that ranks CPS students against other students nationwide. That score is used as part of the selection process.

CPS officials said the policy laid out today ensures a level playing field.

“Assessments are an important tool for measuring a student’s academic growth and success and have always been a factor for admission to our selective enrollment programs,” CPS CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett said. “After hearing feedback from parents, students, teachers, principals and community members, we’ve made a decision to require scores from a uniform assessment in order to streamline the evaluation process and make sure that students across the city are afforded equal opportunities to these competitive schools.”

Officials with the city’s Catholic school system were not immediately available for comment.

All the gory details here FROM CPSOAE.ORG:

http://cpsoae.org/apps/news/show_news.jsp?REC_ID=307572&id=0

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123 Comments Add your own

  • 1. cpsobsessed  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:19 pm

    I think my first thought was “is this really all about TEST PREP?” Personally I’d love to see some new random test admnistered to everyone on the same day so nobody could prep for it. (I say that being a realistic fan of test prep.)
    I just think it’s weird that the powers that be at the top of the education world are open acknowledging the role of test prep in the equation.

  • 2. mom2  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:29 pm

    My first reaction is that CPS parents will be mad that the private school kids will be older and therefore more knowledgeable at the time they take the test and that won’t be fair either 🙂

  • 3. anonymous  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:30 pm

    I am wondering if cps just couldn’t put all the pieces in place for the May testing and needed the extra time. Personally I would rather just have my children (one in 5th for ACs and one in 7th for HS) be able to take the test in May with everyone else. Our school has decided to switch to the MAP and they will be taking that next week. Wish we could just submit those scores and be done.

  • 4. SoxSideIrish4  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:30 pm

    I don’t have a problem with Sr. Mary Paul McCaughey’s students having the extra time bc “parents can request that students retake the test in the fall because of “adverse circumstances”~so kids can retest if need be http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140408/portage-park/private-school-studets-get-more-time-prep-for-test-for-top-high-schools

  • 5. Frustrated Mom  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:30 pm

    CPS acknowledges that its kids will be able to take the test during classroom time on familiar equipment but can’t even tell non-cps families where or when their kids can be tested, let alone whether that will be the same space and equipment for each of the two Saturday sessions. It also specifically acknowledge that fall scores are lower but refuse to permit non-cps families a spring option. Sounds like cps is setting itself up for even more problems. They should just use the selective enrollment test and no other for all students and call it a day. Just my opinion.

  • 6. edgewatermom  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:39 pm

    The biggest problem is that they waited so long to make this decision. If they had made the decision at the start of the school year they would not have had all of these problems. Yes, private school parents probably would have complained about the switch, but they would have been able to deal with it.

    Now they are going to have private school parents complaining that the scores in the Fall could be lower (see @5 above) and public school parents may complain because private school kids will have more time to prepare. Waiting until the 11th hour has pretty much ensured that nobody is going to be happy with the decision.

  • 7. mom_of_3  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:52 pm

    @mom2
    yes, they will be older, but their norms will be taken against Fall testing of other 6th or 8th graders, not against the Spring results of 5th and 7th graders.

  • 8. mom_of_3  |  April 8, 2014 at 2:55 pm

    @5
    It does not really matter that the Fall scores are usually lower – they might be lower for each individual student in terms of number of problems solved, but since only percentiles matter, it should not be an issue. To calculate those percentiles, Fall results are compared to the Fall results of the norm group, not to the Spring ones.

  • 9. OutsideLookingIn  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:02 pm

    I wonder if this is the final, final decision or if CPS would like to use one of its lifelines to phone a friend.

  • 10. GL  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    CPS students basically get a “redo” if their Spring scores are bad. Is that a joke? Are you kidding me? What a debacle.

  • 11. Chris  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:35 pm

    “CPS students basically get a “redo” if their Spring scores are bad. Is that a joke?”

    Wait–so now CPS gets what (some) private school kids got in the past?

    Wonder what the plan is for *next* year’s class. Cannot be the same as this, can it?

    The transition year was going to be bad, no matter what. Can’t believe that they didn’t finalize it until this late, tho. Such a hot button.

  • 12. mom_of_3  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:39 pm

    @10
    Why? This option for Fall testing is being offered only to non-CPS kids. The same as before – CPS student had to submit ISAT scores, everybody else had to submit some other tests, but a CPS student could not take ISAT, wait for his score, decide that it was not good enough, go do a private testing somewhere else, and then submit that private testing results.

  • 13. Chicago School GPS  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:43 pm

    Since the NWEA MAP test was never designed to be used for this purpose, CPS will likely switch away from using it as soon as possible but I heard they may use the MAP test for at least the next two admissions cycles because the PARCC test will be too new to use its first year (which is Spring 2015).

  • 14. Mo Dreyer  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:44 pm

    “CPS officials said the policy laid out today ensures a level playing field.”

    YAY! So this means CPS is dumping the racist tiers system, right???

  • 15. GL  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:45 pm

    Hey Chris–the point is to make a “uniform process” going forward, not to keep making the same mistakes over and over again. If any child previously got more than one chance at taking the test while others didn’t, that was unfair and should not be repeated!!

  • 16. Chris  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:53 pm

    “the point is to make a “uniform process” going forward, not to keep making the same mistakes over and over again”

    It’s all about whose ox is getting gored right now.

    I get it, and is stinks to be affected by it, but this ‘retake’ *claims* to be about illness (primarily/only) AND requires that the spring score go away–which is *still* less than (some) private school kids got in the past–getting to pick the higher of two (or more) scores.

  • 17. Chris  |  April 8, 2014 at 3:55 pm

    mo3: “This option for Fall testing is being offered only to non-CPS kids.”

    Nope, there’s the stated re-take option for CPS kids that is (supposed to be) focused on illness and similar issues. Not that, even if it required demonstrated illness, there won’t be abuse, but it’s *not* a 100% re-take option.

  • 18. Map?  |  April 8, 2014 at 4:23 pm

    Regarding the retake for “adverse circumstances”…I imagine that this is likely related to the problems that have occurred at CPS schools re: computer glitches etc..during the test. For example, and this does happen, if the computer shuts down/glitches/surges while a student is taking the test…the student must start the test over FROM THE BEGINNING. And remember, because it is never the SAME test twice for the same student, this means starting at square one. When this happens (and unfortunately, it happens with frequency) students often become frustrated and/or fatigue can set in affecting a students score. In that event (whether it is a CPS or non CPS student) a retake may be needed. However, just taking the test again because of a poor result rarely results in a higher score UNLESS there was actually a valid reason (illness, fatigue, etc…) why the student scored poorly the first time. The test is surprisingly accurate…

  • 19. Another mom  |  April 8, 2014 at 4:36 pm

    @16 Please note, not every private school had numerous scores to choose from. Our private school took ONE test each year (some years our kids took no tests) and that ONE score was submitted. It was do or die. We had zero advantage. I am tired of this being put out there like it’s a widespread practice among private schools, because it was not. Thank you.

  • 20. RogersParkDad  |  April 8, 2014 at 4:46 pm

    OMG who is sailing the CPS ship? Public school parents mad that private school kids are older on test day. Private school parents worried about their kids losing a few marbles over the summer. This is a case study in poor planning and worse communication. How about a little adult supervision?

  • 21. Chris  |  April 8, 2014 at 4:59 pm

    @19 ” Please note, not every private school had numerous scores to choose from.”

    Please note that *EVERY* time I reference it, I include a qualification about it not being all–in both comments in this thread referring to the practice, I included “(some)”.

    So, I did, in fact, do what you asked me to do after the fact, and so noted that it was NOT every private school..

  • 22. PublicSchoolAlum  |  April 8, 2014 at 5:37 pm

    Concessions should not be made for private school students. Their parents chose to spend money and send them to those private schools for a supposed “better” education. So their children should be more than prepared to test in May. If they don’t like it, then they should keep their children in the private school system (which clearly isn’t better since they are trying to get their children in the public schools).

  • 23. M Gomez  |  April 8, 2014 at 5:44 pm

    I am ok with this. Now my kid have time for test prep plus she will have a full year of pre-algebra under their belt. The more difficult the question on the MAP the higher value it has in scoring. It is not just number correct. I have no issue with the offsite testing. We will already be doing it for the SSAT, HSPT, SEHS and ISEE anyway. And no, we will not prep for each test, we will focus on ISEE and SSAT since it tests for material through 11th grade anyway. Plus MAP since it is new for us and we are taking it first.

    Now that everyone will take the same test, my main concern is what excuse will the public school folks have to complain about “fairness”. LOL! Just kidding 😉 I do think everyone having to take the same test is the best solution.

    This is getting exciting! Good luck!

  • 24. Chris  |  April 8, 2014 at 6:00 pm

    ” So their children should be more than prepared to test in May.”

    I think this is mainly about *CPS* not being able to pull it together for May test dates for non-CPS kids.

    Bet a dollar that someone from CPS (BBB or other), at some point says “we wanted to have the tests in May, but the logistics wouldn’t work because [something not entirely implausible]”

  • 25. A Chase  |  April 8, 2014 at 6:07 pm

    “Free testing will occur on Saturdays at city locations to be announced by May 1. Students will complete the separate reading and math portions of the test over two Saturdays in the fall.”

    Saturdays? Is the city government creating a rule that may be violating certain students 1st Amendment rights associated with free exercise of religion?

    Free testing at city locations? Does that mean people have the option of paying and taking the test where they want?

    Further investigation required.

  • 26. anonymouse teacher  |  April 8, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    I, for one, am absolutely shocked. Shocked I tell you. CPS making a mess of things NEVER happens. Shocked.

  • 27. Christopher Ball (@skepticismwins)  |  April 8, 2014 at 6:26 pm

    @8 and @13 both make good points. The NWEA is not designed as an admissions test, and the use of percentile scores to make admission decisions is a dubious practice.

    Based on the 2011 norm study, changes in percentile cut-scores indicate slight summer learning loss — a single RIT, but mean growth from spring to fall indicates a very small gain (less than 1 RIT) across starting RIT points.

    As Chris points out, if a CPS parent ask that his or her child take the MAP in the fall, the spring score is voided for SE purposes, even if the fall score results in a lower percentile rank. You don’t get to pick the higher of the two scores.

  • 28. Hmmmm  |  April 8, 2014 at 7:25 pm

    @7 “yes, they will be older, but their norms will be taken against Fall testing of other 6th or 8th graders, not against the Spring results of 5th and 7th graders.”

    Yes but all the other CPS 6/8 graders will be taking the test with a more “laid back” frame of mind potentially getting lower scores (maybe the reason fall scores are lower in general??).

    @19 “Please note, not every private school had numerous scores to choose from.”

    Not to dwell on the past…all private school kids had (prior to this year) the option to pay to take the ISAT exam on top of their school test and submit the highest score. Just because you didn’t know about it doesn’t mean it didn’t exist.

  • 29. Oh please!  |  April 8, 2014 at 7:59 pm

    @22 “Concessions should not be made for private school students. Their parents chose to spend money and send them to those private schools for a supposed “better” education. So their children should be more than prepared to test in May. If they don’t like it, then they should keep their children in the private school system (which clearly isn’t better since they are trying to get their children in the public schools).”

    This kind of rhetoric is so absolutely counter productive. As well as juvenile, mean spirited and just plain dumb. I “chose” to send my child to a private Catholic school because she did not win the lottery to attend any of the magnet school options that were geographically feasible. My neighborhood school is on probation, riddled with behavior problems and not an option. I am under no assumption that my child is receiving a “better” education than those in good cps schools. I’m actually aware that I’m PAYING for a lesser education than what cps has to offer in some schools AND paying property taxes. I really don’t give a damn about this testing business, what makes me sick are comments such as the one above that are pure ignorance. The bottom line is, there are not enough decent cps neighborhood schools or spots in magnet and selective enrollment schools, therefore, FORCING parents to “chose” a private school option. Get over yourself PublicSchoolAlum and stop assuming why other families make certain school choices.

  • 30. Shoesmith Community Rep  |  April 8, 2014 at 8:28 pm

    What about kids entering kindergarten? Will they still be tested the old way or will my 4-year-old also be looking at a computerized NWEA assessment?

  • 31. twokidsonedog  |  April 8, 2014 at 8:48 pm

    The statement on MAP testing as provided by Kate Ellis:

    Dear Independent School Providers,
    Thanks so much for attending the meeting on March 5th to discuss changes to the selective enrollment application process. I deeply apologize for the length of time it took for me to get back to you. The unprecedented feedback we’ve received from you and your parents reopened the conversation on the best course of action, and it unfortunately took longer than anticipated to reach consensus.

    Your concerns about the timing of the announcement that your students would have to take the NWEA MAP in the spring have been heard. It has been agreed that all current 7th grade students wanting to apply to CPS Selective Enrollment Schools will take the NWEA MAP test in the FALL of their 8th grade year.

    The Registration period will open May 1st. The registration form will be located on the cpsoae.org website starting May 1st. Please note, Students will need to test on 2 separate Saturdays. Testing will occur at CPS schools throughout the city (locations to be announced on May 1st) between Sept 6th and October 11th.

    For students with special needs, those with a pending evaluation, or those who planned to get evaluated before having to take the selective enrollment exam: These students will still have the time and opportunity to go through the regular CPS process. They should submit paperwork for evaluation immediately if they have not already done so. Evaluations will occur over the summer.

    However, please keep in mind that due to it’s specific nature, only certain accommodations are available for the NWEA MAP. For instance, external, handheld calculators are not allowed; instead, when a calculator is permitted, it will appear on the computer screen as an embedded feature of the test. The accommodations allowed have been determined in conjunction with ISBE and NWEA, and are consistent with what CPS students can be offered.

    I have attached the press release and an FAQ that will hopefully answer most of the questions you may have about next steps on this process, in addition to the links on the parent tool-kit and the sample items from MAP. I would encourage you to pass this information on to your parents so they will be ready for this transition.

    Thank you for your patience and for helping us spread the word to you students.

    MAP Parent ToolKit

    MAP Test-Warm-ups

    CPS FAQ
    CPS Press Release.


    Katie Ellis | Executive Director of Access and Enrollment | 773.553.3546

  • 32. twokidsonedog  |  April 8, 2014 at 9:00 pm

    And the FAQs provided by CPS:

    FAQ

    For CPS students

    Logistics
    1. What is the process to request my child take the NWEA MAP test again in the fall to replace their spring 2014 MAP score for Selective Enrollment?
    The scores of CPS students who test in the spring will be applied to their selective enrollment admissions for SY15-16, except in cases where a parent or guardian requests that their child retake the test in the fall because of adverse circumstances. In that event, parents may request that their child participate in the alternative fall testing any point after their child completes spring testing up until the first day of school (Sept. 2 2014).

    A form to make this request will be made available on the CPS OAE site (http://www.cpsoae.org) by May 1. The child’s home school will be notified of the roster of students scheduled to participate in fall NWEA MAP testing. The school will notify parents of the exact testing dates.

    2. When and where will fall testing take place?
    Fall testing for CPS students will take place at the child’s home school and during the regular school day.

    3. Will students take both math and reading tests on the same day?
    No. Students will be assigned two separate testing dates, one for the MAP reading test and one for the MAP mathematics test.

    4. Is it to my advantage to have my child test in the fall after they’ve already taken the MAP assessment the previous spring term?
    In a small number of cases where your child may have scored lower than anticipated on the MAP assessment(s) due to an irregular test experience (e.g. in cases of illness), it may be to a student’s advantage to test again in fall. In all other cases, it is important to note that performance on the spring assessment is typically representative of the highest instructional point in the year for students. Normative data has shown that summer learning loss may contribute to stagnant or negative performance for fall testers. Please note that for students choosing to take the NWEA test in the fall for Selective Enrollment admissions, the score they receive in the fall will replace their spring score, regardless of which one is higher.

    5. When will I get my child’s results?
    Students will see their RIT score immediately upon completion of each exam. Parents can request a report with their child’s score from their child’s teacher the day after the final test is completed.

    Policy
    6. Why was the change made from ISAT (SAT-10) to NWEA?
    Historically, CPS students have used the ISAT, the Illinois State Board of Education test that all Illinois public schools take as the qualifier for Selective Enrollment tests. As of 2014, CPS students were not able to use the ISAT because the SAT-10 percentiles were no longer included in the test (you can read about the changes here: http://isbe.net/assessment/isat.htm). As a result of these changes, CPS needed to find an alternative measure for use in selective enrollment admissions. In 2013, CPS adopted the NWEA MAP as a rigorous, Common Core-aligned measure of student skill that results in a nationally-normed percentile. This was the best option for CPS to adopt as a qualifying exam for selective enrollment admissions. CPS had allowed private/parochial schools to submit test scores from standardized tests comparable to the ISAT. However, because the NWEA MAP test is so different from other standardized tests, CPS sought an equitable admissions process for all Chicago students interested in applying to one of the District’s highly competitive selective enrollment schools.

    7. If my child has an extreme illness on the scheduled spring or fall test date, will my child be allowed to retest?
    Students who are extremely ill on the test date should not be tested and the student’s school should schedule them for an alternative test date.

    Testing Accommodations
    8. My child has an IEP or 504 plan. Will his/her accommodations be honored?
    Applicable test accommodations described in Section 10 (c) of the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan will be made available. For example, if a child has a fine motor impairment and cannot click on the correct answer choices, and his/her IEP requires that a scribe assist with completing the test, a CPS staff member will be available during the NWEA to serve as a scribe.

    Please be aware that only certain accommodations are available for the MAP test due to its specific nature. For instance, external, handheld calculators are not allowed; instead, when a calculator is permitted, it will appear on the computer screen as an embedded feature of the test.

    9. My child may need extra time to test. Is this allowed?
    All NWEA MAP assessments are designed to be untimed for all students.

    NWEA Test and features
    10. How can my child prepare for the NWEA? Should I invest in test preparation classes/resources?
    Preparing for the NWEA MAP test is achieved through strong, Common Core-based, academic instruction and by managing student expectations.

    The NWEA MAP test is adaptive and builds a custom test for each student taking it. The NWEA MAP item bank aligns with the Common Core State Standards and expands the breadth of goal areas. Success on this assessment is directly impacted by high quality classroom instruction and educational standards. Investing in test preparation classes/resources will not prepare a student to take this type of assessment.

    Parents can help their student prepare for this assessment by sharing information about the nature of the assessment and by working with students on focus and concentration for extended reading and math activities. The MAP Parent ToolKit is an excellent resource for understanding these assessments and includes additional guidance on the types of activities students can do at home to prepare. Additionally, students can sample the test using the MAP Test-Warm-ups.

    11. Does CPS recommend a particular test prep company?
    Chicago Public Schools does NOT recommend, endorse or sponsor ANY test preparation courses, study guides, or sample questions for the Selective Enrollment High Schools testing process.

    The admissions exams used for the Selective Enrollment High Schools are designed to assess your child’s academic capabilities or reasoning and thinking skills. The Office of Access and Enrollment has not seen any direct correlation between student acceptance rates in Selective Enrollment High Schools and their participation courses offered by test preparation companies. Please note that our department receives feedback each year from parents whose children participated in a test preparation course and were not selected for any of their school choices.

    Further, the MAP test is an adaptive test with thousands of test items. As a result, students are unlikely to see the same items as other students.

    Most students have no problem adjusting to the computerized, adaptive format of the test. However, using the sample items and tool kit recommended here will help your child understand the difference between a traditional pencil paper test and an adaptive test to best prepare them for the test.

    12. How does the test work?
    The NWEA MAP assessments are adaptive achievement tests in Mathematics and Reading that are taken on a computer. The difficulty of a test is adjusted to the student’s performance so each student sees different test questions. The difficulty of each question is based on how well the student has answered the questions up to that point. As the student answers correctly, the questions become more difficult. If the student answers incorrectly, the questions become easier.

    13. What content is covered?
    Components for the MAP Reading test include; vocabulary, long passage, short passage, fiction and non-fiction. Components of the MAP Mathematics test include; algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability and numbers and operations.

    14. How long does the test take?
    The NWEA MAP Mathematics test is roughly 52 items in length. The NWEA MAP Reading test is roughly 42 items in length. Although the tests are untimed, it usually takes students about an hour to complete each subject.
    Technology
    15. How can students best prepare for navigating the test: understanding where to click, understanding how to scroll through passages and understanding how to use embedded test features?
    Several resources are available to help students understand the test experience. Students can take a sample test using the MAP Test-Warm-ups as well as watch a video that explains test features. The MAP Student Powerpoint Presentation gives a good overview of the testing experience. The MAP discussion points will also help students prepare for testing.

    16. Can a test be paused if a child needs to go to the bathroom or needs a break?
    Yes, the proctor can pause the test at any time during the test session for breaks.

    17. What will happen if there is some type of technical problem like a glitch with the internet connection or a power outage?
    Occasionally events occur during online testing that interrupt a student’s workstation. The NWEA platform is designed to allow for unexpected occurrences without impacting the accuracy of test results. In cases where a proctor is unable to ‘pause’ or ‘suspend’ a student test, such as power outages, NWEA platform glitches and testing device malfunctions, student data will not be lost. Once the issues is resolved and the student can log back on to the test, they will begin at the point where they left off.

    18. Will my child test on a tablet or laptop/desktop?
    Students will test on a variety of hard-wired and wireless laptops and desktops including Chromebooks and iPads. Your child’s home school will provide testing devices already familiar to your student. All equipment to be used for testing will have been audited for compatibility with the assessment platform prior to the assessment window.

    For Non-CPS students

    1. When and how will we be able to register?
    Parents will be able to register between May 1 and May 30, 2014 by accessing a form available here: http://www.cpsoae.org.

    2. When and where will testing take place?
    Testing will take place at a variety of CPS sites across the city from September 6 – October 11, 2014. Testing will take place on Saturdays, during 3 possible sessions: 8:30-10:30 am, 11:00 am-1:00 pm and 1:30-3:30 pm.

    3. Will students take both math and reading tests on the same day?
    No. Students will be assigned two separate testing dates, one for the MAP reading test and one for the MAP mathematics test.

    4. Will I be able to choose the date and location?
    Parents will be able to indicate preference of location and dates for testing. CPS will try to accommodate parent selections, but we ask for your flexibility as this may not be possible.

    5. When will I be notified of the time and location for testing?
    CPS will send out notification of testing dates by June 21st. A reminder notification will be sent out 2 weeks prior to the official test date.

    6. Will I be able to reschedule if I am assigned a date/location that my child cannot make?
    If you are assigned to a date/location that your child cannot attend, we will attempt to accommodate your need for a reschedule. However, as we will be scheduling thousands of students, we ask that you show as much flexibility as possible.

    7. When will I get my child’s results?
    Students will see their RIT score immediately upon completion of each exam. Parents will receive a report with their child’s scores two weeks after the final test is taken.

    Policy

    8. Does my child have to take the NWEA again in the fall with CPS if my child’s school already uses NWEA?
    Yes. Only NWEA MAP scores from a Fall CPS test administration will be allowed for use in selective applications. This ensures uniform testing environments for all students.

    9. If my child has an extreme illness on the scheduled fall test date, will my child be allowed to retest?
    Students who are extremely ill on the Saturday test date should not come to the testing center and should call the District’s Office of Access and Enrollment on the following Monday, (773) 553-2060, to schedule an alternative test date.

  • 33. cpsobsessed  |  April 8, 2014 at 10:34 pm

    @shoesmith: this isn’t the same as an RGC test – rather is a standarzied test used to assed what kids in older grades have learned during the year (so won’t affect 4yo or other RGC/classical testing.)

    Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile

  • 34. Chicago School GPS  |  April 8, 2014 at 11:59 pm

    @30- per the very helpful FAQs at http://www.cpsoae.org/NWEA-MAP%20FAQs_v1.pdf , the only students needing to take MAP for SEES are those applying to 5th-8th grades:
    Does my child take the NWEA MAP test if he is applying to Selective Enrollment Elementary Schools for grades 5, 6, 7, or 8?
    Yes. The NWEA MAP will be the assessment used to determine eligibility for Selective Enrollment Elementary Schools.

  • […] CPS Announces Uniform Application Process for Selective Enrollment Seats CPS Obsessed:Chicago Public Schools said today that the standardized test being used for the first time in applications to the city’s top selective enrollment schools will also be required for private school students, but that those children won’t have to take the test until next fall. […]

  • 36. mmdemom  |  April 9, 2014 at 10:40 am

    From CPS OAE: “To be eligible to take the admissions exam for the programs below, students must score at the minimum percentiles on the NWEA MAP as indicated:

    Regional Gifted Centers/Classical Schools/International Gifted Programs: 60th percentile
    Academic Centers: 45th percentile
    Selective Enrollment High Schools: 24th percentile”

  • 37. Urban Mommy  |  April 9, 2014 at 11:00 am

    This kind of rhetoric is so absolutely counter productive. As well as juvenile, mean spirited and just plain dumb. I “chose” to send my child to a private Catholic school because she did not win the lottery to attend any of the magnet school options that were geographically feasible. My neighborhood school is on probation, riddled with behavior problems and not an option. I am under no assumption that my child is receiving a “better” education than those in good cps schools. I’m actually aware that I’m PAYING for a lesser education than what cps has to offer in some schools AND paying property taxes. I really don’t give a damn about this testing business, what makes me sick are comments such as the one above that are pure ignorance. The bottom line is, there are not enough decent cps neighborhood schools or spots in magnet and selective enrollment schools, therefore, FORCING parents to “chose” a private school option. Get over yourself PublicSchoolAlum and stop assuming why other families make certain school choices.”

    Thank you. Well said, and complete correct for us too.

  • 38. SutherlandParent  |  April 9, 2014 at 11:48 am

    @9 OutsideLookingIn, once they use up the phone a friend, I’m sure they will ask the audience 🙂

  • 39. reenie  |  April 9, 2014 at 11:49 am

    OK, so we’ve established that CPS made a hot mess out of this because they couldn’t get it together to test private school kids in the spring. Fall scores are lower because kids are being tested on material for the grade they’ve just entered (i.e. stuff they don’t know yet–unless they’re doing advanced work or test-prepped).

  • 40. Shoesmith Community Rep  |  April 9, 2014 at 1:56 pm

    At reenie, the scores aren’t lower because students are being tested on material from the proceeding year. That’s not correct. NWEA is an adaptive test, meaning the questions get easier or harder based on your child’s answer. The RIT score (Rasch Unit) indicates the band of standards at which your child is answering 50% of the questions correctly. This is their “zone of proximal development” which infos the teacher of the appropriate starting point of instruction for that specific student. All of the RIT scores are tied to specific standards on the DesCartes Continuum, which shows a ladder of knowledge and skills from kindergarten (RIT of 140 – 160) up to 8th grade (RIT of 210-220). Kids test worse in the Fall because of summer learning loss, not because the test is harder. The test is adaptive. It gets easier or harder based on how many answers your child is getting right or wrong.

  • 41. I feel for parents  |  April 9, 2014 at 6:01 pm

    I feel for parents on both sides of the fence! I have memorized & become well versed in the SE rules. I am so glad my son who is a Freshman at a SE HS & my other 6th grade son was accepted to an AC (and if need be can just stay at the HS) because I wouldn’t want to go through all of these changes. Hopefully all will be affected by the changes and will put everyone on a level playing field! What’s funny is my 6th grader’s Fall NWEA percentile for reading was higher on the ISAT & for math was lower! But now I realize that the calculator only pops up at certain times when he was permitted to use the calculator for all of the ISAT questions! He actually told me this about the NWEA so I should have listed! I did take the calculator away for homework around October of last year! This is a mess! I am sorry for all of the parents both public & private who have just had the rug pulled out from under them. If this happened a year earlier U would be furious!

  • 42. lawmom  |  April 9, 2014 at 6:27 pm

    The Archdiocese wields a huge influence in Chicago. Not surprised.

  • 43. Agnes  |  April 10, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    Could someone explain to me why this affects (as the CPS website says it does) current 4th graders (who will be entering 5th in Fall 2014)? That is, does the NWEA, , in addition to replacing the ISAT, also replace the RGC/Classical test that current 4th graders would take in fall 2014 for entry into 6th grade SEES in fall 2015?

  • 44. Map?  |  April 10, 2014 at 12:36 pm

    @43 It affects next year’s 5th graders in that they must obtain at least 60% on MAP test to be eligible to apply for SEES

  • 45. 19th ward Mom  |  April 10, 2014 at 12:36 pm

    @43 Agnes

    In order to qualify to take the “RGC/Classical test” , you had to have a certain score on the ISAT starting at grade 5. For K – 4, anyone could take the test.

    Now that certain score on the ISAT, is being replaced by a certain score on NWEA/MAP.

  • 46. Agnes  |  April 10, 2014 at 1:27 pm

    I see, thanks 44 & 45. But until now the ISAT wasn’t the only test one could take for this purpose (prequalifying for the RGC/Classical test after 4th)–any of a battery of intelligence tests (Terra Nova,
    Stanford Achievement Test, Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, Woodcock Johnson Achievement Test, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test) was acceptable as a substitute for ISAT. Is part of what is being changed here the introduction of uniformity at this stage of the process, so that none of those alternatives tests will any longer qualify one for taking tests to get into SEES?

  • 47. Log  |  April 10, 2014 at 5:54 pm

    Who is the big winner here? Nwea. Undoubtably this is more $$$. In their pockets. Cps will pick up all the costs of testing these private school students now. I went to see what the per test cost is but somehow the publicly posted contract has all the prices redacted! How is that for public accountability!

    http://www.csc.cps.k12.il.us/purchasing/pdfs/contracts/2013_06/13-0626-PR1-1.pdf

  • 48. Patricia  |  April 10, 2014 at 6:33 pm

    @47 Log. I believe NEWA is a not-for-profit organization. Unlike other testing companies. Right?

  • 49. BarO  |  April 10, 2014 at 7:48 pm

    “Cps will pick up all the costs of testing these private school students now.”

    Log, you do realize that Chicago residents that send their kids to parochial or private school pay property taxes too that fund CPS while paying for private school at the same time? You seem like a financial whiz, so I’ll make you a deal. You refund all of the property taxes associated with public schools that we paid over the last 10+ years and we’ll cover the cost of the test. Deal?

    Oh a side note, after we are finished getting our “free” 4 years of SEHS that our 2 kids are attending we will be moving out of this state thanks to the never ending tax increases. So you won’t need “pay” for us any longer.

    Somebody call Log a Whaaaaambulance!

  • 50. @BarO  |  April 10, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    As a parent paying tuition and property taxes, I couldn’t agree more. @22 PublicSchoolAlum may need a Whaaaaambulance too!

  • 51. Publicschoolalum  |  April 10, 2014 at 8:36 pm

    I don’t need anything. I just get tired of people running from public schools and bashing the highly qualified staff when they realize those private schools aren’t so great. If you plan on moving then don’t wait and leave Chicago now. Why wait if it’s so bad,

    For the record, my children successfully tested in an academic center last year and a SEHS 3 years ago bc they had quality public school educations. I did the same when I went to Whitney Young in 1988.

  • 52. Veteran  |  April 10, 2014 at 9:03 pm

    OT but well worth the time….probably illegal to produce but it does give one glimpse at the problems in educating children with disabilities.
    https://news.vice.com/video/last-chance-high-episode-one

  • 53. Chris  |  April 11, 2014 at 10:17 am

    “Oh a side note, after we are finished getting our “free” 4 years of SEHS that our 2 kids are attending we will be moving out of this state thanks to the never ending tax increases. So you won’t need “pay” for us any longer.

    Somebody call Log a Whaaaaambulance!”

    And a second Whaaaaaaaambulance for BarO and @BarO.

    You two need to get over yourselves, too.

    BUT I agree completely that Log is off-base complaining about the nickels going into selective-enrollment testing.

  • 54. 19th ward Mom  |  April 11, 2014 at 10:35 am

    I would think this is an Onion article if it wasn’t for the picture that goes along with it.

    Private School kids and parents, protested outside CPS Headquarters over having to take the NWEA/MAP test in September.

    http://www.chicago-bureau.org/test-switch-for-entry-into-elite-cps-schools-spurs-protests/#prettyPhoto

    The class of 2019 SEHS selection process is gearing up as one for the record books. What a year it is going to be, I wish I was watching from the sidelines but I will be right in the middle of this craziness.

  • 55. Anonymous  |  April 11, 2014 at 11:14 am

    @54 19th ward mom.

    I completely agree. I really wish I was watching this from the sidelines but have a 7th grader caught in the crosshairs. Wish I would have thought to have my kids a couple of years ago. In any case we are going to spin the wheel and see where we land.

  • 56. Map?  |  April 11, 2014 at 11:29 am

    @54 & 55 I’m right there with you as a parent of a current 7th grader.

    I have to wonder though…it appears that the protesters are requesting an extra year to prepare for the MAP exam…do they really think it would be okay for them to use a different, non-aligned test while all other students are required to use the MAP test this year?

  • 57. Chris  |  April 11, 2014 at 11:57 am

    “do they really think it would be okay for them to use a different, non-aligned test while all other students are required to use the MAP test this year?”

    Is this a serious question?

  • 58. Gobemouche  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:08 pm

    This is pretty funny. From the article @54-

    Kalina Pon, vice president of the school’s Family Association, said, “We’re Chicago residents who pay taxes just like everyone else, so our children should test under the same circumstances as those in CPS.”

    Um, yes, exactly.

    Everyone is finally on equal footing for the selection process. Same test. No choosing between scores. All administered in a cps computer lab.

  • 59. Map?  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:11 pm

    Yes, in the sense if you click on the link provided, read the placards shown in the photograph, and read the article…that they are requesting either 1. ‘an extra year to prepare’ or (and I am assuming here) 2. using the scores from a X test that they have already taken for this upcoming SEHS application process.

    Perhaps I misread it…but that is what I gathered.

  • 60. Patricia  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:16 pm

    @54
    CPS parents had only a few weeks more notice about MAPS switch than the private schools. It is not as if we have known about it much longer. Although, some CPS parents have had their ear to the ground knowing a switch was coming and over time trying to read the tea leaves figuring it would be MAPS. CPS students are newly familiar with MAPS, but it is kind of new for everyone.

    I guess the difference is CPS students had not taken ISAT yet while private schools took Terra Nova, etc.already. Don’t private schools also use TN scores for other things? Is it just for admissions to CPS schools? That doesn’t sound right to me. So even if CPS made the switch earlier, the privates would have taken the TN anyway. I understand that those applying thought one of the 3 “stressers” in the rubric was over and now they have a new one added. I get that. But, delaying a year? I can’t see that working since the tests are not comparable.

  • 61. Anonymous  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:21 pm

    As a private school parent I am okay with the proposed process. I do wish we didn’t have to wait until the fall for the test (I just know my child will stress about it all summer). Wish they could have gotten it all together to allow for May testing as was originally described. I agree that all should take the same test.

    I don’t see what waiting a year would do. And it doesn’t make sense to use different tests. The more you can standardize the process the more level the field. Sure, there are still some differences. But not as big as using different tests.

  • 62. Chris  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:21 pm

    “Perhaps I misread it”

    I don’t even have to look to know you didn’t misread it.

    *OF COURSE* there are private school parents who want an “unfair” advantage in getting their kids into SEHS. We’re talking about a group (NOTE: *not* any particular individual) that was accustomed to a system where a kid could take multiple tests and submit the highest score. *OF COURSE* they are demanding a continuation of special treatment.

    People (understandably) lose their minds over this process. And this year the process is that much worse than normal. That some lose their minds in this particular fashion (ie, demanding special treatment) is not surprising to me.

  • 63. Map?  |  April 11, 2014 at 12:21 pm

    @60 Thank you Patricia…you explained exactly the sentiment I share…but so much more eloquently!

  • 64. momofmany  |  April 11, 2014 at 3:46 pm

    How is it a more fair process to give private school students an extra 4 months to prepare?

  • 65. Christopher Ball (@skepticismwins)  |  April 11, 2014 at 7:18 pm

    I guess the test aren’t valid if special preparations for them will make you do better.

  • 66. HS Mom  |  April 11, 2014 at 7:47 pm

    LOL right CB that and $ spent on Terra Nova test prep must be considered by CPS when they create policy for their own test.

  • 67. Chris  |  April 11, 2014 at 10:31 pm

    “How is it a more fair process to give private school students an extra 4 months to prepare?”

    If everyone is mad about some aspect of it, they did something right. Maybe not much, but something.

  • 68. HS Mom  |  April 12, 2014 at 2:02 pm

    “If everyone is mad about some aspect of it, they did something right.”

    I have to say that I really feel for all kids now applying to SE schools.

    There are several interesting discussions going on this site all revolving around selective enrollment. What are school placement rates into SE? How can I get my child into a gifted program? What is gifted? Whitney Young movie, cut-offs, validity of tests, fairness of tests and testing conditions.

    I agree with all the parents concerned about the pressure and the process. There are 3 pressure points any one of which makes a difference. This is way too much for any kid. The 7th grade grades are a joke – either you can convince your teacher to give you straight A’s or forget it. Another thing to freak out about. All Catholic school kids now want to be tested in 7th grade and the independent school kids say nothing but boast about SE placement.

    I think we’ve come full circle on this. I’ve come to believe that we should simplify and reduce the pressure to one admissions test in 8th grade, period. Keep the tiers. CPS needs to stop pouring money into 7th grade testing and put its efforts into enforcing the address requirements for correctness of tiers and for Chicago residents (those that think the problem of seats given to kids who commute from the suburbs is non-existent hype are wrong). Kids who enter through the AC system to have the security of getting in early should not be allowed to shop around for an alternative seat at 9th grade unless they choose to lose the guarantee and enter the pool like everyone else. Principals’ discretion should only be allowed for kids who did not get a SE seat.

    And lastly, while I’m dreaming, to address the elephant in the room – between private, independents, RGC’s and just plain old good schools there seems to be a plethora of high scoring students in upper tiers who are denied access to SE schools while lower tier students can still get in with scores around 600. I think that CPS needs a new school that is attractive to public and private families (the program within a neighborhood school doesn’t have the same allure, even Lincoln Park). This school should have an admissions process like a college – transcripts, tests, essay, auditions, references etc. They should offer a variety of programs – sciences, international studies, arts and music, technology and leadership. This school should have the freedom to enroll the best student that fills their need including under represented students from neighborhood schools.

    Feel free to have at it. I believe that CPS has continually improved the system – at a snails pace – and anything they do will be picked apart by someone. At this point I wish you all the best.

    Did anyone call for that whaaaaambulance yet?

  • 69. Framed Blog  |  April 12, 2014 at 2:51 pm

    Make It Happen Sailboat Framed Desktop

    […] ences etc. They should offer a variety of programs – sciences, international s […]

  • 70. SoxSideIrish4  |  April 13, 2014 at 6:19 pm

    68. HS Mom | April 12, 2014 at 2:02 pm

    ‘CPS needs to stop pouring money into 7th grade testing and put its efforts into enforcing the address requirements for correctness of tiers and for Chicago residents (those that think the problem of seats given to kids who commute from the suburbs is non-existent hype are wrong)’

    TOTALLY AGREE!!!

  • 71. Christopher Ball (@skepticismwins)  |  April 14, 2014 at 1:24 pm

    @68 Some sensible ideas there. From what I was told by OAE, the multiple measure entry system was something that the SEHS principals wanted — they didn’t want admission based solely on a single-shot admissions test.

    NYC uses as single-shot custom-made test without any tier-like system to enter the selective admission HS. But they have far fewer seats per students than Chicago does (roughly half in terms of offer per student, excluding LaGuardia because it requires an audition). The flagship schools, which make up the majority of the seats — Bronx Science, Stuyvesant, and Brooklyn Technical — were founded in their current guise before WWII. Their social purpose was never to stem white flight or increase racial diversity. Chicago is not using SEHS as a pinnacle of achievement but as a substitute for high-quality neighborhood schools.

    But NYC has even more “screened” application schools which use grades, standardized score, attendance records and sometimes other criteria (like interviews, writing samples, and portfolios) for entry. Aside from a few schools with stanine-cutoffs for entry, Chicago has no similar program that I know of.

  • 72. Anxious but hopeful  |  April 17, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    I’m just grateful there is a decision and a plan to execute it. The process to get there has not been perfect, but now we know what needs to happen, and we have enough advance notice to be able to work around conflicts.

  • 73. MontessoriMom  |  April 19, 2014 at 9:01 am

    My son’s 7th grade class did a short practice MAP test this week to see how it worked. The program crashed on my son and another kid (2 out of 14) half way during the test, and those two had to restart.

    CPS/OAE’s lack of planning and organization is pathetic. Are they really working with the children of this city in mind? Everything should be in place and decided before a school year begins so everyone knows what to expect *this* school year. But that’s unlikely, right?

    Deciding to change the entire testing system so shortly before is doing no service to all the students in Chicago. My son’s private school was scheduled to take their standardized test in February, and with the new changes, it took over a month to get an answer from CPS what was going to happen. They pushed our date to April, then May, and now it will be in either September or October. Who knows!

    Not sure if it was the same for current 8th graders, but for a couple years they’ve changed the Tiers between the time students took the SE test and the time they received their scores. You go in thinking you’re a Tier 3, but when the test results come in the mail you find out you’ve moved up to a Tier 4, and your kid needs to be much smarter if you’re a Tier 4.

  • 74. WRP Mom  |  April 19, 2014 at 10:20 am

    @MontessoriMom

    I’m an 8th grade parent and the process this year was relatively smooth. Tier changes were done before the application deadline. I was pleasantly surprised. It was 2 years ago when they changed the tiers in February, right before SEHS letters came out. My child was applying to AC’s that year, so I remember it well.

    Yes, CPS is disorganized. Welcome to my world. This is my 9th year as a CPS parent and trust me, this is nothing new. I have found it’s less stressful to assume something will change with little notice, because often this is the case.

  • 75. Psmom  |  April 23, 2014 at 11:23 pm

    My child is a current private school fifth grader. Is there a different “test” for 2-5 grade and 6-8th grade? If so, would she take the 6-8 grade MAP test in the fall?

  • 76. LS Mom  |  May 1, 2014 at 12:02 pm

    Hi All, Has anyone’s child taken the NWEA/MAP test yet? How did your child feel about the test?

  • 77. mom_of_3  |  May 1, 2014 at 12:20 pm

    My 5th grader took math part yesterday, said it was OK. No technical glitches or anything like that. He did not realize that the numbers at the end where his results, so he did not copy them down 🙂 Will have to wait till official results to know how well he did on the test.

  • 78. LS Mom  |  May 1, 2014 at 1:13 pm

    My child is a 7th grader, so he is going to have to power through all the new changes in the CPS mine field of HS admission. I hope this isn’t too rough.

  • 79. Chicago School GPS  |  May 2, 2014 at 2:43 pm

    NWEA MAP Test for Non-CPS Students
    Registration form now available!

    All students who are applying to grades 5-9 for Selective Enrollment Elementary and High Schools and other schools with academic requirements (i.e., CTE Selective Academies, IB High Schools, Magnet High Schools, and Military Academies) for the 2015-2016 school year will need to take the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress (NWEA MAP).

    For students who do not currently attend a Chicago Public School, the NWEA MAP will be offered free of charge in September and October at multiple locations around the city. Click the link below for a copy of the registration form for the test. PLEASE FILL OUT THE FORM IN INK.

    The registration form can be submitted between May 1 and May 30, 2014, to the CPS Office of Access and Enrollment. (The form must be postmarked no later than May 30th.) After your form is received and processed, your child will be scheduled for testing and you will be notified of their test date and location.

    Non-CPS students who plan to apply to grades 5-9 for Selective Enrollment Elementary or High Schools, CTE Selective Academies, IB High Schools, Magnet High Schools, or Military Academies for the 2015-2016 school year will take the NWEA MAP between September 6 and October 11, 2014. Students will complete the separate reading and math portions of the test over two Saturdays. In addition, alternate testing dates will be added for students who cannot test on Saturdays due to religious reasons.

    http://www.cpsoae.org/apps/news/show_news.jsp?REC_ID=310055&id=0

  • 80. HS HS  |  May 4, 2014 at 1:58 pm

    Now that MAP testing is underway would any 7th grade families be willing to post scores so we can try to figure out a baseline? I doubt there will be tons of 99s right?

  • 81. mom_of_3  |  May 4, 2014 at 2:22 pm

    @ 80
    so far I know only math score for my daughter
    6th grade – 274.
    Which according to this puts her in the 99% for up to 10th grade
    http://www.colleton.k12.sc.us/schools/fhe/rit_to_percentile_conversion_chart.pdf
    On the other hand, she tested in and did not get into WYAC this year.

  • 82. Anonymous  |  May 4, 2014 at 2:40 pm

    Also interested in 7th grade map scores. We are at a private school that offered the map this spring. These scores won’t count for cps admission but heard that a number of kids scored above 96th%ile for reading. Too bad those scores can’t be used and the kids have to take the test again in fall. Hopefully the scores won’t change much for those kids. Haven’t heard about math scores. Anyone from cps schools willing to share?

  • 83. No clue when MAP will be given to my CPS 7th grader  |  May 11, 2014 at 6:39 pm

    I’d like to hear from any CPS 7th grade parents about whether your student has been given the Map test. At our school, MAP was on the calendar for 4/28 to 5/23. On 4/27, my student went to bed early, and next morning I made certain she did not skimp on breakfast and packed a good lunch. Well there was no MAP test that week or last week. She was told it probably would be this week, not sure if it will start tomorrow. We were offered a doctor appt she needs at 2pm tomorrow, guess I should call and cancel! Who knows?! See private school parents, we are treated no better than you when it comes to MAP test scheduling. (Worse? At least you will be given a definite day when you apply for the test.)

  • 84. Jones2  |  May 12, 2014 at 4:58 pm

    Is any other CPS school encountering problems with ‘network connections’ and thus rescheduling MAP testing times?

    MAP testing is not off to a good start at my child’s school…also, students are not given adequate time to complete test & are limited to 1 hour. If student doesn’t finish test in 1 hour, school is requiring them to come back to finish up on a ‘make up’ day.

    How are other CPS schools faring with implementing this test?

  • 85. 7th Grade MAP results?  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:06 pm

    My 7th grader has taken the Math test only thus far. Her score is the lowest of all 3 scores Fall, Winter, Spring. Dropped 7 points from Winter. Grrreaat…..

    Anyone else? And anyone have a link to the RIT percentile chart?

  • 86. Gobemouche  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:30 pm

    I think these are the right NWEA RIT conversions. Starts around page 65.

    http://www.nwea.org/sites/www.nwea.org/files/resources/NWEA%202011%20Norms%20Report_01.17.2012_2.pdf

  • 87. Gobemouche  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:36 pm

    83 & 84 – as of today, my 7th grader is finished with both the math and reading portions of MAPS. No tech glitches that I know of, thankfully.

    Also, score conversions start on page 52 of the document I posted above. Again, I think that is the right chart. Can anyone confirm?

  • 88. Jones2  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    Yes, that is the correct chart: 2011 norms…my student has not yet taken either portion (sigh)

  • 89. Gobemouche  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    84 – I’m really surprised your school is limiting their time. AFAIK, maps are not supposed to be timed. My child’s class took four periods in one day for all students to finish just the reading portion.

  • 90. Jones2  |  May 13, 2014 at 4:50 pm

    @89 I know…the only advantage of the test is that it is ‘untimed’ yet our school has set an artificial time limit.

    Curious…how much time does 4 periods amount to? I have been pushing at my school to get the students more time to take the test.

  • 91. IBobsessed  |  May 13, 2014 at 5:40 pm

    I’m going to need wine tonight. Mine “achieved” the lowest score ever on ANY math test ever taken, effectively eliminating admission to any sehs within 10 miles of our home. And guess what? The kid doesn’t want to do IB at the neighborhood school, because the teachers at our magnet have warned the kids away from it. Quote from one of the teachers to me, “But Senn is where the kids who don’t get into SEHS go; and your kid is such a motivated student”. Thanks teachers.

  • 92. NWEA  |  May 13, 2014 at 5:52 pm

    Almost always my children score worse on the spring NWEA administration then they do on the winter. My oldest is already in a SE HS thank goodness! Youngest got accepted to an AC, but I lied to him & told him they would revoke his acceptance if he didn’t do well. He grew in both reading & math! Also, since he was in 6th I told him he could be retained! LOL! I can’t believe that worked! Should have thought about this years ago but then it was a low stakes tests so I always hyped the ISAT! Go figure! If it’s any consolation I think most kids won’t have high scores and cut offs at all of the schools will be lower!

  • 93. edgewatermom  |  May 13, 2014 at 6:00 pm

    @91 IBObsessed. I am pretty sure we are at the same school and I am so annoyed with the teachers about how they talk about Senn! One of my favorite teachers is actually the worst offender. I think at least one parent has mentioned it to him, but I think that I just might have to drop him a note. Senn has SO many wonderful things going on and the IB program is fabulous. It really is a shame that some teachers do that.

  • 94. Gobemouche  |  May 13, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    Jones2@90 – Periods are 45 minutes each, so it took some kids 3 hours to finish. Just to give you some more specifics, my child says they were given 2 periods for math (1.5 hours) and that a few kids didn’t finish, but are going back in to finish this Friday. Hope this helps!

  • 95. Here we go  |  May 13, 2014 at 6:24 pm

    7th grade:

    270 Math
    242 Reading

    Looking at that pdf link posted above, that translates to a 98% math and 94% reading. However, my kid’s teacher gave them the percentiles and said the math was a 99. Not sure which is right.

  • 96. anonymouse teacher  |  May 13, 2014 at 6:36 pm

    @84 and 89 I believe the “time” allotments given to students, one hour time frames, for example, are not meant to be limitations.
    The realities of attempting to get 1000 kids through one computer lab, all of the make up tests done, with 2 adults present at all times within the mandated test window, all while the test frequently just shuts down for, oh, say several hours on a Thursday, is daunting. Schools are not timing NWEA, though I completely understand how one might jump to that conclusion. Its just a logistical scheduling issue.

  • 97. IBobsessed  |  May 13, 2014 at 7:31 pm

    @93 We are at the same school, I believe. The teacher I quoted is a well liked 7th grade female teacher. The other very good 7th grade female teacher has spent entire class periods discussing how important 7th grade test scores are, how nervous they are going to be taking the 7th grade test, and how their future depends on what hs they go to. Not age appropriate pressure, although many here seem to think this is just fine for 12 year olds. I about spoke to the VP about this, and he recommended emailing the principal, and that she would want to know about this. i plan to do so without mentioning teacher names.

  • 98. HSangst  |  May 14, 2014 at 8:16 am

    From those I have talked to it seems there is a drop from ISAT to MAP…about 5-10 %ile points

    Are others seeing this too?

    I guess it’s ok if we are all in the same boat

  • 99. Jones2  |  May 14, 2014 at 9:01 am

    @96 I wasn’t suggesting that our school had nefarious reasons for limiting students to “1 hour time allotments” to take the MAP test…just that they were; and as you suggest, it is most likely due to logistical issues. However, the result is the same & places these students in a position where they are required to take a “high stakes” test under less than ideal conditions.

    Will it negatively affect their scores? IDK

  • 100. @ 98  |  May 14, 2014 at 9:51 am

    6th grade son although his RIT grew, his percentiles last year for ISAT were higher than then NWEA. Math nwea was 10 points lower & reading 5 points lower.

  • 101. MAP testing  |  May 14, 2014 at 10:03 am

    Really hard to say whether taking the test in segments rather than straight throw would help or hurt. Certainly doesn’t seem like a uniform process.

  • 102. HS HS  |  May 15, 2014 at 3:34 pm

    I know iep/504 kids have different requirements to apply to SEHS but are there also differences in overall points required for selection? Just wondering Thanks in advance

  • 103. Chris  |  May 15, 2014 at 4:29 pm

    IBO: ” i plan to do so without mentioning teacher names.”

    How many 7th grade teachers do you have?

  • 104. IBobsessed  |  May 16, 2014 at 10:04 am

    @103 Um, Chris there are 7, one for each subject. (And there are way more than 2 female teachers) Social studies, math, science, reading, technology, art, library.

    I take it you have little kids, but remember in middle school most schools do not have self-contained classrooms.

  • 105. Scores  |  May 16, 2014 at 11:14 am

    Any thoughts on what is a “good” MAP score? Are students scoring 99/99 on MAP?

  • 106. AE  |  May 16, 2014 at 11:31 am

    @105 I know of at least one student with 99/99 on Map — so it can happen — but it seems far less common than on ISAT.

  • 107. Scores  |  May 16, 2014 at 11:33 am

    @106 Is that for 7th grade?

  • 108. AE  |  May 16, 2014 at 11:34 am

    spring 6th grade

  • 109. Chris  |  May 16, 2014 at 12:11 pm

    IBO: “technology, art, library”

    Oh, so the librarian or the art teacher spent a period freaking out the kids about testing and/or Senn? That’s even more inappropriate.

    My not-7th/8th grade kid has 8 teachers, so I’m not ‘forgetting’ about non-self-contained classrooms, but how you phrased it implied that it was “seventh grade teachers” not “teachers of seventh graders who also teach other grades too”.

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