CPS attending community meeting to discussing making change at neighborhood schools

April 9, 2012 at 6:36 pm 10 comments

I can’t make this event, but I thought it was worth posting because of the CPS presence there.  It sounds like it could be highly interesting and informative.  It is somewhat specific to this area of the city, but I think could still be worthwhile if you don’t live there:

Come join residents of the North River Commission for this FREE event as we work to “transform neighborhood schools into the centers of our communities.”

The North River Commission and North Park University welcomes Jennifer Cheatham, CPS Chief Instruction Officer, Adam Anderson, Chief of Staff of the CPS Office of Portfolio, and Theodore Zervas, North Park University Education Professor to address policy changes affecting Chicago Public Schools, including: (1) longer school days and curriculum decisions, (2) family and community engagement strategies, (3) high school admissions and the CPS Tier System, and (4) the future of the CPS Office of Portfolio in Albany Park, North Park, and Irving Park.

• WHO: North Park University, CPS School Officials and the Community
• WHAT: Chicago Public School Informational Meeting and Panel Discussion
• WHEN: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at 7:00PM Central Standard Time
• WHERE: North Park University’s Anderson Chapel – 3225 W. Foster Avenue
• WHY: Inform parents/residents of the upcoming changes to the structure of CPS.

From 7:00PM – 9:00PM CST on Tuesday, April 10th, 2012 the North River Commission and North Park University will partner with Chicago Public Schools and provide a unique opportunity for parents and residents to learn, plan and take action with respect to determining the look and feel of next school year.

According to Julie Putterman, VP of Education at the North River Commission: “The purpose of this meeting is to inform our constituents of the new policy changes that are taking place within the CPS structure so that residents understand the new possibilities that exist for regular neighborhoods to help improve their schools. The entire evening’s dialogue will allow this event to serve as a primer for NRC’s May ‘Education Visioning Session’ when local residents will re-gather to strategize and prioritize an agenda for the North River Commission to pursue in its efforts to transform neighborhood schools into the center of their communities.”

Questions from the neighborhood will be forwarded to members of the panel discussion prior to the start of the discussion. These questions will serve as the product of a month-long canvassing campaign that is currently underway and led by the North River Commission, surveying local civic associations, neighborhood groups, and hundreds of parents as flyers for this event are being distributed to the community.

“The North River Commission, Chicago Public Schools and North Park University expect this to be a fantastic event. It is going to give parents key information that they need in order to make good decisions concerning their child’s education in this time of transition at CPS,” Perry Gunn, North River Commission Executive Director.

_________________________________________________________________

*** IF YOU WANT SPECIFIC QUESTIONS ANSWERED, email Pete Kalenik at pkalenik@northrivercommission.org or call (773) 478-0202 ext. 111, with your thoughts, ideas, and concerns ***

For an understanding of North River Commission’s current Education priorities, please click on the following link: http://northrivercommission.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=79&Itemid=79

* Thank you to North Park University for hosing this event.
* Thank you to Albany Bank & Trust Company N.A. for sponsoring this event

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Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

CPS to open more Selective Enrollment High Schools, says Brizard Longer Day (7.5 hour) protest continue with a parent press conference today

10 Comments Add your own

  • 1. cpsobsessed  |  April 9, 2012 at 6:41 pm

    Also, another teleconference Weds night…

    Please join Chicago Public Schools CEO Jean-Claude Brizard for our next “tele-town hall” teleconference call scheduled for this Wednesday, April 11, at 6 p.m. These tele-town halls are designed to help you, our CPS parents and guardians, understand the various initiatives that are taking place in your children’s schools and provide you the opportunity to ask questions of CEO Brizard and his staff. The topic for Thursday’s tele-town hall is the Full School Day.

    To access the call on Wednesday, please call 1-888-886-6603. When prompted, punch in 18625 and then the “#” sign to be connected.

    We hope you will be able to join CEO Brizard and other members of his team on Wednesday. Again, thank you in advance for engaging in this discussion and for the invaluable role you play in boosting the academic success of your children

  • 2. fosterrice  |  April 10, 2012 at 10:42 pm

    Tuesday April 10 was a full night! We also had an LSC at my neighborhood school plus a forum for LSC candidates form various Lincoln Square schools (Waters, Coonley, Amundsen, Budlong, MacPherson, etc..) at the Dank Haus. All on the same night! If someone attended this event I’d love to hear more about it since it would be really valuable to any of us running for LSCs this election. Thanks!

  • 3. Christine  |  April 11, 2012 at 9:41 am

    I attended the forum last night and am working on a summary.

  • 4. Christine  |  April 11, 2012 at 11:21 am

    There forum was planned to go from 7 – 9. There was about 1.5 hours of speeches followed by 20 minutes or so of Q & A. The audience was given notecards and encouraged to write questions on the notecards and submit them to the panel. Considering how often we were reminded to do this, it’s a shame that there was so little time for Q & A.
    Nate Mouttet, VP of Enrollment and Marketing at North Park University gave the welcome and introductions. He spoke about North Park University’s proud history of engagement with the community around issues of education. He also showed some plans for upcoming additions to the North Park Campus.
    Julie Putterman, VP of Education at the North River Commission spoke next and gave an overview of the North River Commission and some it’s recent education-related accomplishments.
    Pete Kalenik, Education Project Coordinator at the North River Commission walked us through some maps and data that had been handed out. The Commission’s area is bounded by Devon to the north, Cicero to the west, Addison to the south and the River to the east. The maps showed the elementary, middle, and high schools within those boundaries. There was also a color-coded map showing the Tier breakdown of the Commission’s area (mostly Tier 4 with some Tier 2 and 3 to the southeast). A Data summary showed that there are approximately 21,707 children served by the 26 schools, on average 81% of those students qualify for free or reduced lunch. There has been a drop in the overall population as well as school-age population in this area since 2000. The Commission’s area falls under the O’Hare Elementary Network.
    Next up was Carmen Rodriguez, the evening’s moderator. She is an LSC Parent Representative at Peterson Elementary, North River Commission Board Member and Real Estate Executive. She introduced the evening’s speakers: Jennifer Cheatham, CPS Chief Instruction Officer; Adam Anderson, Officer of Portfolio Planning and Strategy; and Ted Zarvas, Assistant Professor and Education MATC Coordinator at North Park University.
    Mr. Anderson spoke first. His main objective was to explain, in some detail, how the Tier System works and why it’s important as a selection tool for students at magnet and selective enrollment schools. As we CPS Obsessed readers know, the Tier is a rough approximation of SES, based on six factors with the population of a census tract. Household income is only one of those six factors. As far as the “why” goes, Ms. Anderson basically stated that establishing a school with a balanced socio-economic population benefits everyone. A balanced, diverse population improves learning outcomes for all students, and gives children the chance to live and learn alongside children from many diverse backgrounds.
    Ms. Cheatham spoke next. She walked us through the mission statement of CPS and admitted that CPS is not doing very well with meeting their stated goal. She outlined three priorities for the current administration: Common Core Standards, Instructional Framework, and Full School Day. She spoke at length about the full school day and how the decision came to be made to move CPS to a day longer than 5.75 hours. She also talked about how parent feedback was the chief reason for the comprise for a 7-hour school day.
    Q & A was the final portion of the evening. Ms. Rodriguez noted that there were numerous questions from the audience, far more than could be fielded in the time remaining for the evening, sadly.
    Questions included:
    1) What democratic channels do parents have to get their voice heard by CPS
    2) What policies are in place or coming to make parents welcome and able to communicate and volunteer at schools?
    3) How do you know an extra 90 minutes makes the difference in performance? How will you measure to determine whether or not the longer school day is a success?
    4) Have you factored in how the longer school day will impact transportation, homework, and after school activities?
    5) What can you do about class size?
    6) There’s a rumor that Mayor Emanuel plans to privatize specials like art, PE, and Special Ed? Is this true?
    7) Is CPS partnering with the CTA and park district to make the longer day work logistically?
    8) Over the last 30 years, we’ve been through so many similar plans with CPS. Why should we have hope now?

  • 5. fosterrice  |  April 11, 2012 at 4:16 pm

    Thanks! Sounds informative. I’m sorry I missed it.

  • 6. old irving preschool mom  |  April 11, 2012 at 4:46 pm

    I actually did not think it was that informative, at least for the purpose I attended. I attended specifically to hear about the fourth point above–the future of the CPS Office of Portfolio in Albany Park, North Park, and Irving Park. There was no discussion of this issue, at all.

    I submitted a very specific question (with two sub-questions) to the panel, which the moderator took the liberty of changing from a very specific question, to a fluffy “softball” question. This really p-ed me off.

    I felt all of the information provided was either available on-line (tiers and common core) or sufficiently non-specific to sound like a political stump speech (common core and longer school day).
    Given that I can read about the tier system, the common core standards, and the longer school day on-line, I found the forum to be a total waste of time.

    I appreciate what the North River Commission is trying to do, but I did not find this forum helpful at all. I think there were a lot of people with very good, very specific questions submitted (a few Christine mentioned above), and about 4 of those questions were answered in 2 minutes with instructions from the moderator to answer “yes” or “no.” I think it would have been far more helpful to have a 2-hour Q&A period, where the attendees actually get to ask the questions.

  • 7. Angie  |  April 11, 2012 at 5:46 pm

    What is this rumor about privatizing special education?

  • 8. Christine  |  April 11, 2012 at 7:38 pm

    I ran out of time and did not get to write out the answers that the panel gave to the questions:
    1) What democratic channels do parents have to get their voice heard by CPS
    — Ms. Rodriguez, the moderator, described her experience as a parent and LSC member who is involved in the school, attends PTO meetings, etc. and then suddenly a decision is made by CPS about some huge issue that impacts you.
    — Mr. Zarvas addressed this one and basically said that the community has to step in and take responsibilty for what happens in schools.

    2) What policies are in place or coming to make parents welcome and able to communicate and volunteer at schools?
    — Ms. Cheatham fielded this one but honestly I can’t remember exactly what she said. Hopefully someone else who was there can help me out.

    3) How do you know an extra 90 minutes makes the difference in performance? How will you measure to determine whether or not the longer school day is a success?
    — Ms. Cheatham stated that they took into account the research and feedback from experienced teachers. She didn’t really address the measurement issue as we were in a rush to get to other’s questions.

    4) Have you factored in how the longer school day will impact transportation, homework, and after school activities?
    — Ms. Cheatham said yes

    5) What can you do about class size?
    — Ms. Cheatham responded that the research on the issue of class size is inconclusive and that an effective teacher can minimize whatever deleterious effects large class size might have.

    6) There’s a rumor that Mayor Emanuel plans to privatize specials like art, PE, and Special Ed? Is this true?
    — Ms. Cheatham said this was not true

    7) Is CPS partnering with the CTA and park district to make the longer day work logistically?
    — Ms. Cheatham said yes

    8) Over the last 30 years, we’ve been through so many similar plans with CPS. Why should we have hope now?
    — Ms. Cheatham answered that our Mayor is obsessed with education and has assembled an aggressive, highly motivated team to turn around the school system in the city.

  • 9. Mayfair Dad  |  April 12, 2012 at 11:28 am

    Adam Anderson, Officer of Portfolio Planning and Strategy

    Is this kid old enough to drink yet? Doogie Howser.

    Apparently he invented optimizing space utilization to support academic needs. Just ask him. MBAs invent everything.

  • 10. markavrely  |  May 28, 2012 at 7:03 pm

    http://butupo.wordpress.com – Now all is clear, thanks for a explanatiob.

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